#IWSG Blog Hop–My Regrets for 2017

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It’s that time again. IWSG hosts a blog hop the first Wednesday of every month. Writers get to discuss their doubts and fears they’ve conquered, their struggles and triumphs. Even though writing is a lonely activity, it doesn’t mean you can’t surround yourself with people who understand what you’re going through.

Showing vulnerability makes you strong. If you’d like to read more from bloggers who shared their personal experiences, then please click here.

December’s question–As you look back on 2017, with all its successes/failures, if you could backtrack, what would you do differently?

If I could backtrack in 2017, then the first time one of my books only had 1 KENP read on Amazon, I would’ve contacted KDP select help support. I let it go, and that dropped my rankings significantly on some of my books. Researching, it looks like many authors were having the same problem as me during those few months. Something about a glitch in the ‘page flip’ feature on kindle. My silence resulted in lost income, and a decent ranking on Amazon. Bad ranking=no visibility for readers to find your books.

I also would’ve never given up contacting bloggers for interviews and reviews for my books, especially Twisted Obsession. After a handful of no’s and non-responses, I got frustrated and quit. No promotion online=no visibility for readers to find your books. Trust me when I say I learned my lesson and am being proactive contacting bloggers for my new release Six Plus One.

If I could backtrack, then I wouldn’t have quit my Duotrope subscription. For the past year, my writing buddy and I have followed Ray Bradbury’s advice of write 1 short story every week for 52 weeks straight. We only have 4 stories left!!! I’m proud of us. If I was smart, I would’ve kept my Duotrope in order to search for online journals and magazines to submit to. I could’ve had a presence in the short story market…plus, I’d love to be in more anthologies. It seems like I’m always late to the party when it comes to finding out deadlines. Duotrope would keep me in the loop.

Those are my biggest regrets for 2017. Instead of viewing them as something to be upset about, I’ve grown and can admit I’ll do things differently in 2018. Lesson learned.

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

#IWSG Blog Hop–Character Part of You?

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It’s that time again. IWSG hosts a blog hop the first Wednesday of every month. Writers get to discuss their doubts and fears they’ve conquered, their struggles and triumphs. Even though writing is a lonely activity, it doesn’t mean you can’t surround yourself with people who understand what you’re going through.

Showing vulnerability makes you strong. If you’d like to read more from bloggers who shared their personal experiences, then please click here.

October’s question–Have you ever slipped any of your personal info onto your characters, either by accident or on purpose?

Yes, I’ve absolutely slipped my personal info onto my characters. In fact, I tend to do it all the time on purpose. With my women’s fiction novella, Something’s Amiss, I based the female main character, Poe, off my personality. Children made her nervous, she didn’t want to become a mother, she tried to hide her pain from others, and she pushed Oliver away instead of embracing him. Totally me–that whole pushing people away thing. I really liked Poe. Unfortunately, some readers didn’t like her AT ALL. It made me think they probably wouldn’t like me in real life either 🙂

There’s a scene in Something’s Amiss where Poe was talking to Dominic on the porch. They were reminiscing about their WVU days. Those anecdotes shared between the characters were things that really had happened to me. It was fun sneaking a part of me into the story, knowing I had a secret. The only people who would know were if my readers had gone to college with me and lived in Summit Hall during my resident assistant years.

Another example of slipping my personal info onto my characters–Finia, the female main character of my novella Twisted Obsession, was an accountant. Accounting had been my major at WVU. Finia’s home and neighborhood  in the story was based off my house that I grew up in as a teenager.

It’s fun slipping in my personal information when I’m writing stories, so I’ll probably continue to do so.

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby