Interview With Tanya R. Taylor, Author of Infestation

In celebration of Women’s Horror Month, please welcome my special guest Tanya R. Taylor, author in mostly the paranormal/supernatural genre. Please enjoy her insightful interview.

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1. Do you have any advice for other writers trying to get published?

I would say make sure to study the craft before publishing because you want to ensure that what you produce for the public is as well written and professionally presented as possible. No book that I’ve ever seen, whether it was Indie published or traditionally published, is error-free, but at least we can strive for ‘near letter perfect’ as a seasoned agent once told me. So, once you’ve written the story you’d love to share and have covered these bases, you’re good to go.

You may find that some people you think would automatically support or encourage you with your creative endeavors actually don’t. They may feel that you’re just wasting your time, but if that happens, don’t be discouraged. Use it as fuel to move forward and accomplish your dream of becoming a published author.

2. Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you! I am so grateful to all my readers — many of whom have also subscribed to my newsletters. Sometimes when I don’t quite feel like writing, I think of all the people who are looking forward to my next release and there’s no way I would let them down. The procrastination disappears and I immerse myself in the new world I have begun creating in my mind.

3. What are your thoughts on the fact that both trade and self-published authors have to promote their own work?

Some people believe that traditionally published authors just sit back and relax while their publishers handle all the marketing. Not true. It’s still that person’s book and although they’re under contract, the publisher expects them to be proactive right along with them when it comes to promoting their own title. Indie authors obviously must market as well in order to see a good number of sales. I know it’s not an easy task for writers who are not good at marketing and would rather just write, but in order for your hard work to pay off financially, you must view it not only as a hobby, but as a business. Every successful business regularly implements promotional strategies. Marketing helps visibility and visibility often leads to further sales.

Choosing not to promote can keep a good book “hidden” for years and even decades to come.

4. What genre do you write for? Your favorite aspect? Your least favorite aspect?

I write mainly paranormal/supernatural, although I write in other genres as well. I love getting into these types of stories and feeling what my characters feel. And I try to present a good theme regardless of how eerie, scary or troubling some events in the story may be. My favorite part is when something really touching comes up and my own emotions are stirred even though the story is purely fictional. There’s nothing about writing these types of books that I don’t like.

5. What are your current/next projects?

I’ve just released a drama titled ’10 Minutes before Sleeping’. There’s nothing paranormal about that, but it’s a powerful story nonetheless. Now, I am working on ‘The Haunting of Merci Hospital’ which will be released on April 30, 2017. Then onto the fourth book of the Cornelius Saga – ‘We See No Evil’. I’m also wrapping up a ghostwriting project and will have to get back to adding more books to the Real Illusions series since some readers have been asking me to not end the series with part 4 which was my intention. After receiving another request recently on my Facebook page to add more books to the series, I know I must include that project in my schedule for this year as well. I aim to please my readers.

6. How do you find time to write?

Sometimes it’s really tough to find time to write with so much going on from day to day. But I treat my writing as a priority by scheduling time into my day whether it be early in the morning, late at night or both, for working on my projects.

7. Did you always want to become an author?

Always. I was writing stories from very young.

8. Is there any writing rituals you complete before creating your manuscripts/drafts?

I take time to envision the plot, then I start an outline. I try to follow that outline as much as possible, but oftentimes, my stories take on a life of their own and I go with the flow. However, the main parts of the plot I always manage to include.

9. Do you write the beginning/opening first or do you tend to write out of order (with whatever scenes interest you the most)?

I always write the beginning first.

10. While you were writing, did you ever feel like you were one of your characters?

Oh, yes. Some of my characters have some of the same characteristics as I do.

11. How did you come up with the title?

It usually just falls into my head. I don’t have to brainstorm.

12. What inspired you to write your latest book? What is the book about?

‘1o Minutes before Sleeping’ was on my mind for about two years. I had learned about a mother who was having a tough time and as I thought of her, I got ideas about a fictional story involving a young woman who’s been pretty much rejected and abandoned by those who should have loved and cared for her. As those ideas came, the entire plot unfolded in my mind.

The story takes the reader on a journey of a lady named Eva — from her infancy to adulthood — and the things she suffered along the way. There was a time when she found happiness for the first time in her life, then tragedy occurred. Eventually, it seems as if things are beginning to improve, then a series of events take place that culminate to something completely unexpected. It changes Eva’s life forever. This story is quite touching and wasn’t so easy to write due to some of the scenes.

13. Any blogs, websites, social media you’d like to share?

Thanks again, Tanya!

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby