#BookReview: Starving Ghosts In Every Thread by Eric LaRocca #amreadinghorror

***Thanks for the free copy in exchange for an honest review***

Teddy has a secret….

She’s so consumed with guilt that it compels her body to literally unravel unless she feeds off the emotions of others. Teddy’s parasitic condition is usually tempered easily and is invisible to most, unless she feeds from them. However, her insatiable hunger has already begun to threaten her safety. Trapped in her tiny Connecticut hometown thanks to a careless mistake which cost her a prestigious scholarship, Teddy grieves her father’s death and cares for her neurotic mother, Mercy, who is convinced scorpion venom is the only remedy for her own peculiar skin ailment linked to her daughter’s sadness.

Once an aspiring songwriter, Teddy now merely alternates between shifts at the local market and visits to the house of her eccentric neighbor, Mr. Ridley, for fresh scorpions to bring to her mother. It’s during one of her routine visits to Mr. Ridley’s subterranean grotto of exotic animals that Teddy meets an unusual young girl named Kiiara. Immediately enamored with one another, Teddy soon discovers that Kiiara is hiding a gruesome secret, too – a secret that will threaten to undo everything Teddy has ever known and loved, and violently touch all those who cross their path with disaster.

I enjoyed this fast-paced novella. The author was great with setting details. The book was character-driven focusing on Teddy and Kiiara. The drama was interesting. Since there was no horror (for me as a reader) until the very end of the story, I couldn’t tell if this story was literary, horror, or fantasy. Whenever Teddy could read a person, part of her skin would coil. Was this just in her head? Was she the only one this happened to? Was this a fantasy world? A normal world? I couldn’t tell, but those questions not being answered didn’t stop me from liking the story.

My favorite lines: 1) “I often feel lost, even to myself.” 2) “Everything I’ve lived, I’ve lived through other people. I’ve convinced myself that their stories, their troubles, their passions were mine.” 3) “The thing I’ve so desperately tried to convince myself otherwise is true–people know.”

The ending was pretty intense. The very last scene I felt for Teddy. It was a lasting impression of what she did after making her mom go to the neighbor’s house. I thought about it long after finishing the novella, which I gave props to the author for writing a compelling drama.

I RECOMMEND this book to read.

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

Book Review: Wendy Won’t Go By Amanda M. Lyons

Billy and Sara are living a life of fear. Every day and every night since Sara was small they have been haunted by a terrible apparition. She is cold and she is cruel, strange and frightening. Her name is Wendy, and no matter where they go and no matter what they do, Wendy Won’t Go.

19519293I enjoyed this short story with no chapters. It was frightening–reminded me of the movie Unborn. With the very first paragraph, I was hooked. That mental image of the dead mother crawling with her body all twisted played with my emotions. I had to read this book with the light on!

My favorite lines: 1) He refuses to treat his wife like a boogeyman no matter how much she has come to fit that mold. 2) Death meant pain and loss, but it also meant peace and the hope of a new beginning.

The mom, Wendy, had died while giving birth to Sara. The dad, Billy, was a writer and took care of his daughter. Wendy would show up often to harass and strike their daughter. By the opening, I thought it would scare me up to the end, but it didn’t. Towards the middle, the story started getting more philosophical and drama filled (concerning Sara sad about thinking her mom hates her and getting into how Wendy came about being dead but can still bother her family). It was still a good story though.

I RECOMMEND this book to read.

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby