I’ve Been Writing…Just Not What You Think

I’M FREE

Before getting covid on Christmas Eve, I was a busy bee. Nonstop, I was drawing character sketches for my Unscripted graphic novel. In fact, I even drew a 24-page comic in October as a comic’s challenge! Every day, I was working on my script for Unscripted. I don’t show any of that on this blog since it’s for my horror writing, but if you want to check out my progress, I share on my Instagram page and I have a YouTube channel.

After covid, I’m still a busy bee, writing my Unscripted graphic novel script and drawing.

Plus, I created a free newsletter called Inspire. Awaken. In Awe. It shares my spiritual journey. I’m getting out of feeling in a rut by paying attention to the angel numbers coming my way. I’ve been more productive in the past couple of months than what I’ve done in the past year or two. If you’d like to check out my spiritual newsletter, I’d really appreciate it.

This Thursday, I’ll be starting a short story challenge with my writing buddy. I’m excited to get back into the groove of writing fiction again. Anything’s possible. I’m holding on to that 🙂

I LOVE BEING FREE. I can do whatever I want and it feels wonderful!

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

3 Things I Learned From Libbie Hawker’s “Take Off Your Pants! Outline Your Books For Faster, Better Writing”

  1.  Successful stories that stay in readers’ minds have a character that wants something but an internal or external factor prevents the character from getting it, forcing him/her to struggle throughout the book. The character either succeeds or fails in getting what he wants at the very end.
  2. All successful stories begin with the main character’s big internal flaw in the first scene or chapter. This sets the hook and the readers become invested in the character’s journey.
  3. As a writer, knowing your main character’s flaw helps you plot your book because the events in the story “must provide a logical framework for your character’s arc.”

Libbie Hawker’s book helped me realize that writing a plot outline takes more than just focusing on the events of your story. You also have to seriously consider the character’s emotional journey. For all the writers out there, what have you learned about plot?

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

8 Things I Learned From Stephen King’s “On Writing”

1.  Don’t make a conscious effort to improve your vocabulary. One of the worst things you can do is dress up your words because you think you should use longer ones, shameful of your shorter words. Usually the first thing that pops up in your head is right.

2.  Elements of Style is a very useful book. Avoid the passive tense. With action verbs, the subject of the sentence is doing something. With the passive verb, something is being done to the subject of the sentence.

  • For example, passive tense:  The tree was chopped down by the ax.
  • Action tense:  The ax chopped down the tree.

3.  Adverbs are not your friends. Always include ‘s even if the last letter of a word is s. Easy books contain lots of short paragraphs including dialogue paragraphs and a lot of white space.

4.  In fiction, the paragraph is less structured; it’s the beat instead of the actual melody. Fragments can streamline narration, create clear images, create tension, and vary prose. The key is not to worry about grammatical correctness but to make the reader get lost in your story, to make them experience what your characters are doing/feeling.

5.  If you want to be a writer, read and write a lot. Every book has a lesson. The good ones teach you writing style, good narration, plot development, etc. The bad ones teach you what not to do.

6.  Stories consist of narration (moves fiction from point A to Z), description (creates a sensory reality for readers), and dialogue (brings characters to life with conversations). Where is plot? Nowhere. Stories pretty much make themselves. The job of the writer is to give them place to grow and transcribe them. Lean heavily on intuition.

7.  In fiction, a situation comes first. Then characters. Your job is to narrate it. Good description is a learned skill–hence why you should read and write a lot. You learn only by doing. Thin description leaves the reader feeling nearsighted. Overdescription buries readers in details. The trick is to find a happy medium.

8.  Description begins in the writer’s imagination, but should finish in the readers.

For anyone who’s read Stephen King’s On Writing, what lessons did you learn?

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby