Check Out Mystery Author John W. Howell’s Interview!

Welcome John W. Howell! I just finished this thought-provoking and very enjoyable read – a blend of mystery, friendship, and family, with a helping of supernatural. Get your copy now – the price is only 99 cents until November 1st! I am introducing a new book this month titled Circumstances of Childhood. It is a […]

via #BadMoonRising John W. Howell #supernatural #mystery #family — Books and Such

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#BadMoonRising Yawatta Hosby #IndieAuthor #thriller

Check out my author interview in celebration of 31 days of October. #BadMoonRising

Books and Such

Today’s indie author shares her thriller novella, along with a chilling paranormal account I wish I’d experienced with her.  Welcome Yawatta Hosby to Bad Moon Rising!

Baby or no baby, Finia’s determined to live life her way.

Too bad that doesn’t fit Miki’s version of a happy ending. He owns her. No leeway. If she fights back, then he’ll make her regret it.

Miki will get his perfect family by any means necessary.

Any paranormal experiences you’d like to share?

I had a ghost experience when I was a kid. I was waiting by the door to go to school. The door was near a full length mirror attached to the wall. The mirror turned gray, like fog, then a ghost appeared. He wore a 1940’s hat and suit. He just stood there. I yelled for my dad. When he approached the mirror, it was only our reflections. The ghost…

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#IWSG Blog Hop–Character Part of You?

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It’s that time again. IWSG hosts a blog hop the first Wednesday of every month. Writers get to discuss their doubts and fears they’ve conquered, their struggles and triumphs. Even though writing is a lonely activity, it doesn’t mean you can’t surround yourself with people who understand what you’re going through.

Showing vulnerability makes you strong. If you’d like to read more from bloggers who shared their personal experiences, then please click here.

October’s question–Have you ever slipped any of your personal info onto your characters, either by accident or on purpose?

Yes, I’ve absolutely slipped my personal info onto my characters. In fact, I tend to do it all the time on purpose. With my women’s fiction novella, Something’s Amiss, I based the female main character, Poe, off my personality. Children made her nervous, she didn’t want to become a mother, she tried to hide her pain from others, and she pushed Oliver away instead of embracing him. Totally me–that whole pushing people away thing. I really liked Poe. Unfortunately, some readers didn’t like her AT ALL. It made me think they probably wouldn’t like me in real life either 🙂

There’s a scene in Something’s Amiss where Poe was talking to Dominic on the porch. They were reminiscing about their WVU days. Those anecdotes shared between the characters were things that really had happened to me. It was fun sneaking a part of me into the story, knowing I had a secret. The only people who would know were if my readers had gone to college with me and lived in Summit Hall during my resident assistant years.

Another example of slipping my personal info onto my characters–Finia, the female main character of my novella Twisted Obsession, was an accountant. Accounting had been my major at WVU. Finia’s home and neighborhood  in the story was based off my house that I grew up in as a teenager.

It’s fun slipping in my personal information when I’m writing stories, so I’ll probably continue to do so.

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

#IWSG Blog Hop–Writing Surprised You?

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It’s that time again. IWSG hosts a blog hop the first Wednesday of every month. Writers get to discuss their doubts and fears they’ve conquered, their struggles and triumphs. Even though writing is a lonely activity, it doesn’t mean you can’t surround yourself with people who understand what you’re going through.

Showing vulnerability makes you strong. If you’d like to read more from bloggers who shared their personal experiences, then please click here.

September’s question–Have you ever surprised yourself with your writing? For example, by trying a new genre you didn’t think you’d be comfortable in?

I’ve surprised myself with my writing. Growing up, I only focused on dramas and mysteries. In 2011, I focused on my women’s fiction novella Something’s Amiss. It was going to be a romance, but I hated all the rules that came with the genre. My men aren’t manly enough, and my ladies aren’t likable enough. Oh well. My drama Room For Two was published in an online literary magazine. My very first short story that got recognition. I was so proud of myself.

Then, I found out about NaNo–a fun challenge of writing 50,000 words in the month of November. 50,000 words! I’ve never written that except for NaNo haha. 30,000-40,000 words is my sweet spot. Since NaNo was supposed to be fun, I didn’t take it seriously. I figured it would be fun to experiment with a genre I’ve never written before. I love horror movies, so why not try writing a horror or thriller story?

My very first NaNo challenge created One By One. I wrote exactly what I’d like to see on the big screen. It took me 30 days to write 50,000 words. Then, it took me a year to revise and edit. I was lucky to have my writing buddy Jim Baroni–a horror author–offer to edit my novel. He helped me keep my publishing schedule. Ever since, I’ve been dabbling in horror and suspense stories. That’s my passion right now. One day I’ll go back to dramas though. I absolutely love a story that can make me cry.

My writing has surprised me, and I hope it continues to do so.

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

#IWSG Blog Hop–Valuable Lesson in Writing

It’s that time again. IWSG hosts a blog hop the first Wednesday of every month. Writers get to discuss their doubts and fears they’ve conquered, their struggles and triumphs. Even though writing is a lonely activity, it doesn’t mean you can’t surround yourself with people who understand what you’re going through.

Showing vulnerability makes you strong. If you’d like to read more from bloggers who shared their personal experiences, then please click here.

July’s question–What is one valuable lesson you’ve learned since you started writing?

In the 7th grade, I took a chance by signing up for Mrs. Kirby’s creative writing class. Art had been my passion. Art was all I knew. I had been drawing since I was 8. I loved her class–everything about it. I’ve been writing fiction since 11 years old.

Throughout the years, I’ve learned a lot about writing, but the most valuable lesson that has stuck with me would have to be…listening to music helps set the mood. Music is a must when writing anything. Since I love writing in public places (Daily Grind being my favorite), I never leave home without my headphones.

Spotify is my best friend. The app is downloaded on my tablet and my phone. No shame–I can listen to the same playlists or the same songs for hours straight, and each time the music plays over again it’s like the first time.

When I need to get in a romantic mood for a scene, I listen to Dru Hill, Jagged Edge, Justin Timberlake, Brandy.

When I need to get in a dark mood for a scene, I listen to Civil Twilight, Staind, Seether.

When I need to get in a happy mood for a scene (yeah right–me?–when do I ever write anything happy haha), I listen to Danity Kane, Mya, Destiny’s Child.

When I need to get in a drama mood for a scene, I listen to Mary J. Blige, Mariah Carey, Christina Aguilera.

You get the point. Don’t be afraid to let music inspire you.

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

#IWSG Blog Hop–Calling It Quits?

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It’s that time again. IWSG hosts a blog hop the first Wednesday of every month. Writers get to discuss their doubts and fears they’ve conquered, their struggles and triumphs. Even though writing is a lonely activity, it doesn’t mean you can’t surround yourself with people who understand what you’re going through.

Showing vulnerability makes you strong. If you’d like to read more from bloggers who shared their personal experiences, then please click here.

June’s question–Did you ever say “I quit”? If so, what happened to make you come back to writing?

Technically, I’ve never said that I’ll quit writing, however, quite a few times I’ve considered quitting fiction writing. At least two times since I’ve published my novellas and short story. I’m a fast writer, but a terribly slow reviser. Sometimes it’s very hard to find motivation to keep going when it takes me a year to publish one book while other self-publishers knock out books every other month. Sometimes it seems like I’ll never be a hustler or pro-active–skill sets a person needs to succeed in this industry.

That self-doubt kicks in all the time. There’s always a voice in the back of my head that says my writing sucks and my critique partners and beta-readers are too nice to point it out.

The feedback I tend to keep getting is my scenes lack emotion. I’m a thinker, not a feeler. That’s why my characters are usually in their heads a lot, thinking of their situation instead of feeling it or acting it out. I’ve also been told that I can be too fast-paced scene to scene.

From this feedback, I’ve questioned my writing skills as a fiction writer. I think I’d be better suited as a screenplay writer or a comic book/graphic novelist. A medium that allows my fast pace writing. My favorite story elements are dialogue and plot. I’m all about the twists and the bittersweet endings. It’d be so cool to see one of my short films on YouTube or to see one of my comics on a bookshelf. There’s less of a stigma being an indie creator in the comics world than in the publishing arena.

After I published Twisted Obsession, I sort of gave up writing novellas once it didn’t sell well. I couldn’t write anything new, and I couldn’t revise my old stuff. I was stuck. I didn’t write or edit any fiction for more than half a year.

Instead, I spent my time drawing comics, by taking free online classes to learn this medium. I also wrote short films and worked on a teleplay with two people. We were going to try and sell it to Netflix. My focus was on being creative and doing what made me happy at the time.

What brought me back to fiction writing–my writing buddies. Melissa and I took a free online writing class from Iowa. Those six weeks of creating a short story every week was pretty cool. It let me know instead of giving up completely on fiction, I could dabble in short stories. Short stories can give short film ideas. Around this time, I also heard from Meka. We shared what had been going on with each other over the year and started bonding again. It was refreshing to see someone in the same boat as me. She motivated me to start revising Six Plus One again. I don’t know what I would’ve done without her. She’s went beyond a normal critique partner, looking over my short novella in multiple stages. I owe her big time.

Thank you Melissa and Meka for getting me back into the writing groove 🙂

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

 

#IWSG Blog Hop–Will I Ever Be Able to Market Myself?

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It’s that time again. IWSG hosts a blog hop the first Wednesday of every month. Writers get to discuss their doubts and fears they’ve conquered, their struggles and triumphs. Even though writing is a lonely activity, it doesn’t mean you can’t surround yourself with people who understand what you’re going through.

Showing vulnerability makes you strong. If you’d like to read more from bloggers who shared their personal experiences, then please click here.

May’s question–What is the weirdest/coolest thing you ever had to research for your story?

This month I chose not to answer that question. Instead I’d like to discuss my fears on marketing myself as an author. I published my debut novel back in 2013–4 years ago, and I swear I’m probably still at the mediocre level of “marketing” myself as an author that I was back then. I’m proud of my blog. I really am. It has over 200,000 hits. However (there’s always a but), the majority of my hits come from visitors  interested in my INTJ posts. That’s not my readership…I introduced book reviews and author interviews to my blog, hoping to find readers. I don’t have a clue if I met my goal or not of reaching readers interested in the horror and suspense genres.

I’m hit or miss on social media since I don’t use it quite often. I mean, I love twitter but more as interacting with people interested in my favorite tv shows. I feel icky whenever I tweet something about myself. I’m not one of those authors who constantly tweet “buy my stuff!” I hate Facebook. No one ever sees my posts because I refuse to pay anything to boost (or promote) my stuff. I will say that I’ve made a lot of connections with comic book artists and novelists in my Facebook groups. Again, not my readership…The best way I’ve reached readers is through Goodreads. It’s been a slow process but well worth my time. I’ve made genuine connections by being a reader myself on the site.

I need to find a way to create a happy medium for marketing myself. No one will be able to find my books if I don’t share that they are out there. I’m not charming enough to sell myself in person. The only way anyone has known that I write novellas is when someone else spoke up for me ha ha. I’m good at passing out business cards, but I need to create an elevator pitch to sell myself. I’ve been at this for 4 years–I need to do better.

Sometimes I wonder if I’m even in the right field. Instead of creating fiction, maybe I should have been a comic artist or graphic novelist (drawing is my favorite passion)? Or a screenwriter?

I study constantly what works for other authors and then try to implement those strategies. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. Knowing marketing is all about experimenting, I don’t mind that aspect. I just wish I could find motivation to promote or market every day. I wish I had that hustle that most self-publishers do.

I need to do better. I will do better. Or will I?…I hate this self-doubt that I have, but I can’t seem to fight it off.

Let’s try this again–I need to do better. I will do better.

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby