Book Review: The Accordion By Don March

***I received a free copy in exchange for a book review***

Late 1800’s, a handsome cavalry officer falls in love with the beautiful daughter of a traveling musical instrument merchant. The young officer and the beautiful young girl find a deep romantic bond and also a connection to an accordion, but war separates the couple. With the help of their connection to the accordion, he goes on a frantic search to find his lost love.

83770f1e79497748a07bca70d42376fc72f2bbb4-thumbThis 20 chapter book was confusing and very hard to read because it felt like a first draft. From the first to very last page was nothing but run on sentences (comma after comma after comma instead of periods), no question marks or semi-colons when needed. The dialogue didn’t run smoothly because after every single quote, it narrated “he said” or “she said.”

  • There was NO editing at all. Even famous celebrities were spelled wrong. Its Katy Perry (not Katie Perry), Britney Spears (not Brittany Spears), Matt Damon (not Matt Damien), and its the Red Sox (not RED SOCKS)!!! I would have stopped after Chapter 3 because it was a headache trying to figure out what was going on. I finished because I promised a book review, so felt obligated.
  • Some examples of awkward phrases you’d have to shift through if you bought the book: 1) “Mr. Strazinski, this is my room and some of these ruffians are my crew, and again who are you,” Mr. Strazinski answered and then demanded. 2) He nodded to her a long nod and look, nodded to Papa and then he and his men and Stephan walked off, Stephan turned his to catch Camilla’s eyes, their eyes met for one last look. 3) “I would never betray my cousin and such a beautiful lady. I hope you take care of him in your new life,” Stephan said, he and Marie nodded, Marie, head down scurried off. 4) “So where are to, we are walking there,” Matt asked…

Besides all these glaring problems, there was a story in there. Stephan met Camilla in Chapter 5 (the first 4 chapters involved Stephan at war, alongside his cousin and friend). He got injured, so Camilla and her dad nursed him back to health. They fell in love (but it was more like telling rather than showing). They separated once he returned back to his duties. These two were spent on the longest–I enjoyed their Soprani accordion lessons. Plus, I liked the scene where Stephan bonded with his little nephew Basil. Basil needed to decide if he wanted to be in the army as a Lancer or if he wanted to be a priest.

  • The story then continued with Basil and his wife; they moved to America. Then Tommy tried to convince a girl he met at his concert to be his true love. There wasn’t really a transition to these new characters, so I didn’t get a chance to care for them. They were just there. These sections seemed very rushed compared to Stephan and Camilla’s journey of finding love.

If The Accordion was listed on Amazon or Goodreads, I would give it a 1 star.

I DO NOT RECOMMEND this book to read.

For more information on the book or author:

  • Email– dmarchbooks(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Keep smiling,

Yawatta Hosby

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4 thoughts on “Book Review: The Accordion By Don March

  1. It sounds like it could have been a good story idea, but very badly executed. I hate occasions like that – where you want to fix the story, but can’t because it’s been written by another writer.
    Whilst it’s saddening that you felt obliged to continue reading something you didn’t like, I’m glad you posted such a truthful review. Perhaps it will help other writers who are tempted to publish their first drafts realise otherwise.

    • Hey Miss Alexandrina,
      I agree. Please, please, please never publish without revising, editing, revising, editing, revising, and editing some more.

      Usually I can finish a book in a day or a day and a half. But this one took me 5 days, now I’m a little behind with my book reviews. Thank goodness, authors are patient 🙂

      Keep smiling,
      Yawatta

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